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Embark on a culinary journey through time and explore the flavors and dishes of the Viking Age. These authentic Viking recipes will give you a taste of the foods that nourished the legendary Norse warriors. From hearty stews to rustic bread, these dishes provide a glimpse into the Viking's daily life and culinary traditions.

By the way - to eat and drink them in the traditional Viking way grab a set of Viking Drinking Horns and Viking Cutlery.

1. Hearty Viking Stew

A staple in the Viking diet, this rich and flavorful stew is made with slow-cooked meats, root vegetables, and a mix of earthy spices. This recipe is perfect for a cold winter night or a filling meal after a long day of adventure.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb beef or venison, cubed
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 3 carrots, chopped
  • 2 parsnips, chopped
  • 2 turnips, chopped
  • 4 cups beef broth
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried sage
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary

Instructions:

  1. In a large pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onions and cook until softened.
  2. Add the meat and cook until browned on all sides.
  3. Stir in the carrots, parsnips, turnips, salt, pepper, thyme, sage, and rosemary.
  4. Pour in the beef broth, bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and let it simmer for 1-2 hours, or until the meat is tender and the vegetables are cooked through.
  5. Serve hot with a side of Viking flatbread or rustic rye bread.

2. Viking Flatbread

This simple and versatile flatbread is made with only a few ingredients and can be enjoyed with stews, soups, or as a standalone snack.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tsp salt

Instructions:

  1. In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt.
  2. Gradually add the water, stirring until a soft dough forms. Knead the dough for a few minutes until smooth.
  3. Divide the dough into 6-8 equal pieces and roll each piece into a thin, round flatbread.
  4. Heat a dry frying pan over medium heat. Cook each flatbread for 2-3 minutes on each side, or until puffed and golden brown.
  5. Serve warm.

3. Skyr with Honey and Nuts

Skyr is a traditional Icelandic dairy product, similar to yogurt, that was enjoyed by Vikings. It is high in protein and can be enjoyed with a variety of toppings.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups skyr
  • 4 tbsp honey
  • 1/2 cup mixed nuts, chopped
  • 1/2 cup mixed berries (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Divide the skyr among four serving bowls.
  2. Drizzle each bowl with honey and top with chopped nuts and berries, if desired.
  3. Serve immediately.

4. Gravlax

This Scandinavian delicacy features cured salmon with a mix of fresh herbs and spices. Gravlax is traditionally served thinly sliced on rye bread or crispbread.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb fresh salmon fillet, skin on
  • 1/4 cup salt
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp crushed black pepper
  • 1 large bunch fresh dill

Instructions:

  1. In a small bowl, combine the salt, sugar, and crushed black pepper.
  2. Spread half of the dill on a large piece of plastic wrap. Place the salmon fillet skin-side down on the dill, and then cover the fillet with the salt mixture. 3. Top the salmon with the remaining dill and wrap the plastic wrap tightly around the fillet.
  1. Place the wrapped salmon on a tray or dish and refrigerate for 48-72 hours, turning the fillet every 12 hours to ensure even curing.
  2. After curing, remove the salmon from the plastic wrap and gently scrape off the dill and curing mixture.
  3. Thinly slice the gravlax and serve on rye bread or crispbread with a dollop of mustard sauce.

5. Cold Cured Trout

A flavorful dish that showcases the bounty of Scandinavian rivers, this cold-cured trout is infused with juniper berries, dill, and other spices.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb fresh trout fillets, skin on
  • 1/4 cup salt
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tbsp crushed juniper berries
  • 1 tbsp crushed black pepper
  • 1 large bunch fresh dill

Instructions:

  1. In a small bowl, combine the salt, sugar, crushed juniper berries, and black pepper.
  2. Spread half of the dill on a large piece of plastic wrap. Place the trout fillets skin-side down on the dill, and then cover the fillets with the salt mixture.
  3. Top the trout with the remaining dill and wrap the plastic wrap tightly around the fillets.
  4. Place the wrapped trout on a tray or dish and refrigerate for 24-48 hours, turning the fillets every 12 hours to ensure even curing.
  5. After curing, remove the trout from the plastic wrap and gently scrape off the dill and curing mixture.
  6. Thinly slice the cold-cured trout and serve on rye bread or crispbread with a dollop of mustard sauce.

6. Viking Barley Porridge

Barley was a staple grain in the Viking diet, and this warming porridge makes for a filling and nutritious breakfast or side dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup pearl barley
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup milk or cream
  • 1/4 cup honey or brown sugar (optional)

Instructions:

  1. In a large saucepan, combine the pearl barley, water, and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 45-60 minutes, or until the barley is tender and most of the liquid has been absorbed.
  2. Stir in the butter and milk or cream, and continue to cook for an additional 5-10 minutes, or until the porridge reaches your desired consistency.
  3. Sweeten with honey or brown sugar, if desired, and serve hot.

7. Pickled Herring

Pickled herring is a staple in Scandinavian cuisine and was enjoyed by Vikings as a preserved food source during long voyages.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb fresh herring fillets
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tbsp pickling spices (such as mustard seeds, allspice, and coriander)
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup fresh dill, chopped

Instructions:

  1. In a saucepan, combine the vinegar, water, sugar, and pickling spices. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Allow the pickling liquid to cool to room temperature.
  2. Layer the herring fillets, onion slices, and dill in a glass jar or container. Pour the cooled pickling liquid over the herring, making sure all the fillets are fully submerged.
  3. Seal the jar or container and refrigerate for at least 48 hours to allow the flavors to develop.
  1. Serve the pickled herring on rye bread or crispbread, or as part of a traditional Scandinavian smorgasbord.

8. Honey-Glazed Root Vegetables

A simple yet satisfying side dish, these honey-glazed root vegetables celebrate the earthy flavors of the Viking Age.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups mixed root vegetables (such as carrots, parsnips, and turnips), peeled and chopped
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 tsp dried thyme

Instructions:

  1. In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the chopped root vegetables and cook, stirring occasionally, until they begin to soften and turn golden brown, about 10-15 minutes.
  2. Drizzle the honey over the vegetables, and season with salt, black pepper, and thyme. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, for an additional 10-15 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender and caramelized.
  3. Serve hot as a side dish or mixed into a hearty Viking stew.

9. Viking-Style Mead

Mead, a fermented honey-based beverage, was a popular drink among the Vikings. This recipe offers a simplified version for home brewing.

Ingredients:

  • 3 lbs honey
  • 1 gallon water
  • 1 packet wine or mead yeast
  • 1/2 cup raisins (optional)
  • 1/2 cup orange or lemon zest (optional)

Instructions:

  1. In a large pot, heat the honey and water over medium heat, stirring until the honey is fully dissolved. Do not boil.
  2. Allow the honey mixture to cool to room temperature, then transfer it to a sterilized fermenting container.
  3. Add the yeast and any additional flavorings, such as raisins or citrus zest. Seal the fermenting container with an airlock.
  4. Allow the mead to ferment for 2-4 weeks, or until the bubbling in the airlock slows down.
  5. Rack the mead into a secondary fermenting container, leaving any sediment behind. Allow the mead to age for an additional 2-6 months, or until it reaches your desired flavor and clarity.
  6. Bottle and enjoy chilled from a Viking Horn.

10. Salted Caramel Apples

This sweet and salty treat highlights the flavors of autumn and the Viking Age.

Ingredients:

  • 4 large apples
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup salted butter
  • 1 tsp sea salt

Instructions:

  1. Core the apples and cut them into wedges.
  2. In a saucepan, combine the sugar and water over medium heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Continue to cook, without stirring, until the mixture turns a golden caramel color.
  3. Remove the saucepan from the heat and carefully stir in the heavy cream, salted butter, and sea salt. The mixture will bubble up, so be cautious.
  4. Return the saucepan to low heat and cook, stirring constantly, until the caramel is smooth and all the ingredients are fully incorporated.
  5. Allow the caramel to cool slightly, then drizzle it over the apple wedges or serve it as a dipping sauce.

Enjoy these authentic Viking recipes as you immerse yourself in the flavors and culinary traditions of the Norse warriors. From hearty stews to sweet treats, these dishes offer a taste of history that will leave you craving more.

1 Response

Julie

Julie

January 11, 2024

Thank you! I love your page and so these recipes! So glad I found you.

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